What home made meal did you enjoy today?

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1 week 6 days ago - 1 week 6 days ago #48237 by KentE
I'm only familiar with Thai curries, and similar texture cajun dishes-- but a spoon (or extra rice) is normal for me, because I can't stand to leave the sauce behind.

Soteria 2.0 : what is the effect of the grated apple? Just for the sweetness, or does it do something else?

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1 week 6 days ago #48240 by Soteria 2.0
Japanese Curry vs. Thai or Indian Curry

The consistency of Japanese curry sauce is much thicker and the taste is on the sweeter side.
The sweetness comes from caramelized onions, grated apples, and carrots.
It is also less spicy.
I don't think it actually tastes sweet.
You can't taste the apple, but it adds a layer of flavor.
It has a sweetness compared to Thai and Indian curry.

Vermont Curry (Small Box: 4.05 oz, 115 g)
Vermont
A curry that includes apples and honey for a deliciously mild flavor.

This is the most popular brand.
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1 week 5 days ago #48249 by Phoniac

Chelle wrote: Persian rice with a crunchy layer of tahdig is pretty much a daily staple in our house. I make it with virtually every meal.


Looks very appetizing - how do you make it? <Couldn't find Slurp emoji>

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1 week 5 days ago #48253 by Chelle

Phoniac wrote:

Chelle wrote: Persian rice with a crunchy layer of tahdig is pretty much a daily staple in our house. I make it with virtually every meal.


Looks very appetizing - how do you make it? <Couldn't find Slurp emoji>


There's a traditional way that I no longer do, now that I have a Persian rice cooker.

Asian rice cookers switch from "cook" to "warm" after the water is absorbed.

Persian rice cookers have a timer that lets the rice continue to cook for as much as an additional hour.

Here's mine:



You add a little oil, then the rice, seasonings, and stock (or water) and 90 minutes later you have perfect tahdig!
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1 week 5 days ago #48266 by KentE
Thanks, Chelle. I had looked up recipes after your earlier post, and they all sounded like a lot of work & time. Should have known you'd have a 'hack'.
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1 week 4 days ago #48269 by Chelle

KentE wrote: Thanks, Chelle. I had looked up recipes after your earlier post, and they all sounded like a lot of work & time. Should have known you'd have a 'hack'.


In the Persian community using the rice cooker would be considered "weekday" tahdig.

The time intensive version would be "weekend tahdig" and it's got a lot more love built in. ;)

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1 week 4 days ago #48271 by Phoniac
Thanks Chelle. Do you have a pic of your tahdig showing the non-brown side?

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1 week 4 days ago #48273 by Chelle

Phoniac wrote: Thanks Chelle. Do you have a pic of your tahdig showing the non-brown side?


It's just plain old fluffy Basmati rice.

Here's a pic of a wedge of rice along with some chicken tikka masala I made, awhile back. It shows that, beyond the crunchy layer, the rest of the rice is fluffy.

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1 week 4 days ago #48278 by Phoniac

Chelle wrote:

Phoniac wrote: Thanks Chelle. Do you have a pic of your tahdig showing the non-brown side?


It's just plain old fluffy Basmati rice.

Here's a pic of a wedge of rice along with some chicken tikka masala I made, awhile back. It shows that, beyond the crunchy layer, the rest of the rice is fluffy.


Thanks Chelle. Definitely need a <slurp, slurp, yum, yum> emoji for your culinary creations! If you don't mind, could you share your recipe for the chicken creation?

Now you have me thinking of getting that rice cooker. Will the Persian rice cooker and tahdig work with brown rice instead of white rice?

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1 week 4 days ago - 1 week 4 days ago #48280 by Chelle

Phoniac wrote:

Chelle wrote:

Phoniac wrote: Thanks Chelle. Do you have a pic of your tahdig showing the non-brown side?


It's just plain old fluffy Basmati rice.

Here's a pic of a wedge of rice along with some chicken tikka masala I made, awhile back. It shows that, beyond the crunchy layer, the rest of the rice is fluffy.


Thanks Chelle. Definitely need a <slurp, slurp, yum, yum> emoji for your culinary creations! If you don't mind, could you share your recipe for the chicken creation?

Now you have me thinking of getting that rice cooker. Will the Persian rice cooker and tahdig work with brown rice instead of white rice?


Chicken tikka masala is a very common dish made with lots of dairy (yogurt, cream, butter) and various Indian spices. I'm sure there are a bazillion videos on YouTube that will show it better than I could write it. Fortunately, it's pretty easy to make!

Tahdig is made in many ways, although I haven't seen a brown rice version. I'm sure it would work great though! Try to use Brown Basmati rice, though. Basmati really is the best and it comes in a brown version, even if it is a little harder to find.

Persians sometimes vary their tahdig by placing cooked spaghetti (all pasta is called macaroni, so it would be called "macaroni tahdig"), or thinly sliced potatoes, or pieces of lavash (a flatbread) on the bottom of the rice cooker and then placing the rice on top. When you flip it over onto a serving dish your crunchy tahdig layer ends up being a nice change of pace!

While potato tahdig is loved by everyone, I think that macaroni tahdig is even better.

For a REAL change of pace you can skip the rice all together and make macaroni (actually spaghetti, remember?) with a crunchy potato tahdig layer.

Every culture has their version of crunchy rice. The Persian version is just the most widely known. Each time I've been to the Philippines I've been treated to "tutong", which is equally delicious!

It's very addicting!

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