Anyone else notice how "Voila" is "Walla" on the internet?

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2 years 1 month ago - 2 years 1 month ago #1613 by JTSR71
The first time I saw this, it took me a bit of time to realize what had happened.

Today, I saw "walla walla". Was completely confused about that until I just googled it now and found there is a song called "Voila Voila".

The fact that "walla" makes sense phonetically, makes it all the more maddening. I have to actually recognize that the dunderheads who made the mistake cannot really be blamed for mis-spelling something they've only heard with no appreciation whatsoever that it's French.

:angry:

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2 years 1 month ago #1619 by Oldbooks1
Voici la solution.

Lisez seulement Le Monde


On a practical level, the solution is to start a petition to address this critical diacritical problem.

Since you will be on vacation the month after next it would be important to mobilize public awareness quickly and get something done perhaps on 4/1.

An obvious idea would be to schedule speaking events for leaders in the field of education perhaps on the National Mall that day.

A simple petition focusing on the importance of diacritical marks could be circulated in advance on the Internet.

It might be called the "diacritics are fun today" petition as that would give it the catchy "DAFT" cachet.
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2 years 1 month ago #1652 by Isamorph
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2 years 1 month ago #1657 by Oldbooks1
The most amusing story I have is about a French colleague who spoke English well but with a very strong French accent.

During a meeting with a very senior person from a country with abundant mineral resources, he asked the following question:

"Why does your country have such high-quality ore?"

Unfortunately one of the words came out sounding like an English word that has a rather different meaning and the situation became a little tense.
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2 years 1 month ago #1659 by JTSR71

Oldbooks1 wrote: The most amusing story I have is about a French colleague who spoke English well but with a very strong French accent.

During a meeting with a very senior person from a country with abundant mineral resources, he asked the following question:

"Why does your country have such high-quality ore?"

Unfortunately one of the words came out sounding like an English word that has a rather different meaning and the situation became a little tense.


A certain fake President who I shall not name, would reply:

"We have the best ore"

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2 years 1 month ago #1660 by Isamorph
A certain fake President who I shall not name, would reply:

"We have the best ore"


Yes---and our ores will help make America great again.Voila!
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2 years 1 month ago #1663 by Oldbooks1
If one want a quick overview of why American English is the way it is, the video below is a good place to start.

www.merriam-webster.com/video/old-school-grammar


If one want to get a sense of how different French is, one can take a look at the rapid progress that has been made on the official French language dictionary. After a mere 25 years of work, almost 2/3 of the project has been completed.

www.academie-francaise.fr/le-dictionnaire/la-9e-edition
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2 years 1 month ago #1731 by Oldbooks1
In an inversion of the theme of this thread, the slogan, "Yes We Can" which become iconic here in the US in 2008 has now made its way into the upcoming French Presidential election this May.

When translated into French, it appears as "Oui On Peut" which definitely should have the same impact on the French ear as Walla Walla has on the American one.

www.cnn.com/2017/02/24/europe/france-obama-17-president-trnd/

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